St John's Anglican Cathedral

Ann Street, Brisbane

Norman & Beard Ltd, London & Norwich, 1909
Installed 1910 B.B. Whitehouse & Co., Brisbane
Additions 1912, 1914, 1915 & 1924
3 manuals, 30 speaking stops, tubular-pneumatic action
Rebuilt & enlarged 1972 Hill, Norman & Beard, Melbourne
4 manuals, 81 speaking stops, electro-pneumatic & electro-magnetic action
Tonally redesigned and revoiced 2008-10 W.J Simon Pierce, Brisbane
4 manuals, 82 speaking stops, electro-pneumatic & electro-magnetic action




[Photograph by John Maidment (December 2009)]

Historical and Technical Documentation by Geoffrey Cox
© OHTA 1989, 2007, 2011, 2014 (last updated July 2014)

The foundation stone of St John's Cathedral was laid in 1901, and the first portion of the building (comprising the sanctuary, chapels, transepts and two bays of the nave) was consecrated in 1910. The architect, John L. Pearson, who had recently designed the new Truro Cathedral in Cornwall, had been chosen by Bishop Webber, for whom he had also designed a church in London. John Pearson's son Frank continued the work his father began.1 The building is in Early English Gothic style, with many characteristics of French Gothic, built largely in local stone: external coursed rubble of porphyry, and internal freestone dressings of brown Helidon sandstone.



East end of the Cathedral, viewed from below the cliffs in Adelaide Street
[Photograph by Simon Colvin (May 2008)]




Sandstone arches and triforium passages at the completed west end
[Photograph by John Maidment (October 2007)]


From 1910 until the mid 1960s, the building remained much as it was opened. The east end, comprising the sanctuary, side chapels and transepts, adjoined just two bays of the nave with a temporary west wall.



The incomplete St John's Cathedral, c.1911
[Photograph from an undated postcard
in the possession of Simon Colvin]


The second phase of the building, comprising an extension of a further four bays to the nave, was commenced in 1965 and consecrated in 1968 by Archbishop Philip Strong. Again, a temporary west wall was constructed.



The 1910 building extended in 1968
[Photograph by Howard Baker (September 1989)]

The final phase of construction commenced in 1989, comprising the completion of the nave, construction of the south-west porch and west front, addition of the north and south towers, completion of the central tower, and the addition of the three spires. The completed building was consecrated by Archbishop Phillip Aspinall in October 2009.






The north and south towers under construction in 2007
[Photographs (1) by Simon Colvin from the central tower,
and (2) by John Maidment (October 2007)]


The surrounding buildings, including the Deanery, Webber House, Church House, and the former St Martin's Hospital, are all of architectural and historical significance.2



Courtyard between the former St Martin's Hospital and the Cathedral,
with the towers still under construction
[Photograph by Trevor Bunning (October 2007)]






The completed Cathedral in 2009
[Photographs by John Maidment (December 2009)]

The specification of the organ was announced in The Brisbane Courier on 8 January 1909 as having been drawn up by the organist, Mr George Sampson. It was stated at the same time that the order for 'supplying' the instrument had been entrusted to Messrs. B.B. Whitehouse and Co. of Brisbane, and that it was expected it would be erected in time to be opened in November that year.3

In the event, the organ and the building were not completed until late in 1910. The instrument was built by Messrs. Norman & Beard Ltd, of London and Norwich, in collaboration with the Brisbane firm. It was completed in time for the consecration of the building on Friday 28 October 1910:

The consecration of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Evangelist took place yesterday with imposing ceremonial . . . A fine organ has been installed. The specification of the instrument was prepared by Mr. George Sampson, F.R.C.O., organist of the Cathedral. The organ was built by Messrs. Norman and Beard, of London, in conjunction with Messrs. B. B. Whitehouse and Co., Brisbane, a large portion of the organ being made in Brisbane. The manual pedal, draw stop, and piston action is the latest system of tubular pneumatic, ensuring perfect repetition, whether the manuals are used single or coupled. The console is made according to the revised Royal College of Organists' pattern. The organ is blown by a kinetic electric blower of 10 horse-power, which supplies 2500 cubic feet of wind per minute. The portion of the organ at present erected cost about £2900 and the cost to complete the instrument will be a further £2000.4

The organ was officially opened on Wednesday 30 November 1910, with a recital by George Sampson.5

The records of Messrs Norman & Beard Ltd show that the organ had been ordered in February 1909. The order book records an intended specification of 50 stops, exactly as announced in The Brisbane Courier in January 1909, only 23 of which were supplied in the first instance. Seven of the prepared-for stops (and also couplers) were added between 1912 and 1924, as shown below:


[1924]

Space for


Space for



Space for

Space for
GREAT ORGAN
  1. Double Diapason
  2. Open Diapason
  3. Open Diapason
  4. Open Diapason
  5. Stopped Diapason
  6. Hohl flute
  7. Harmonic Flute
  8. Principal
  9. Fifteenth
10. Mixture
11. Trumpet
12. Clarion
CC to C
16ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
4ft
4ft
2ft
3 ranks
8ft
4ft
(61 notes)
wood throughout 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
wood 61 pipes
wood 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 183 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes


Large Extra pressure
Medium Extra pressure
Small Extra pressure



Flute tone
Soft

Extra pressure
Extra pressure
   

[1915/1924]

Space for


Space for

Space for

Space for
Space for


[1914]
[1912]
SWELL ORGAN
13. Double Diapason
14. Open Diapason
15. Open Diapason
16. Stopped Diapason
17. Dulciana
18. Vox Angelica
19. Gemshorn
20. Lieblich Flute
21. Fifteenth
22. Mixture
23. Double Bassoon
24. Cornopean
25. Oboe
26. Clarion
27. Vox Humana
CC to C
16ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
4ft
4ft
2ft
3 ranks
16ft
8ft
8ft
4ft
8ft
(61 notes)
wood-metal 61 pipes
wood-metal 61 pipes
wood-metal 61 pipes
wood 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 110 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 183 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes



Small


2 sets of pipes




Extra pressure


Extra pressure

   

Space for

Space for


Space for
Space for


Space for

Space for
[1924]
CHOIR & SOLO ORGANS
28. Double Diapason
29. Open Diapason
30. 'Cello
31. Dulciana
32. Stopped Diapason
33. Claribel
34. Flauto Traverso
35. Suabe Flute
36. Flautina
37. Viol d'Orchestre
38. Clarinet
39. Orchestral Oboe
40. Tuba
CC to C
16ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
4ft
4ft
4ft
2ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
(61 notes)
wood throughout 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
wood 61 pipes
wood 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
metal 61 pipes
In special Swell box

Small







Violin tone


Extra pressure
   

Space for

Space for
[1924]

Space for

Space for
[1914]
Space for
PEDAL ORGAN
41. Double Diapason
42. Open Diapason
43. Open Diapason
44. Violone
45. Bourdon
46. Principal
47. Bass Flute
48. 'Cello
49. Trombone
50. Posaune
CCC to F
32ft
16ft
16ft
16ft
16ft
8ft
8ft
8ft
16ft
8ft
(30 notes)
wood 30 notes
wood 30 notes
metal 30 notes
metal 30 notes
wood 30 notes
wood 30 notes
wood 30 notes
metal 30 notes
metal 30 notes
metal 30 notes

(stopped)


Not too small

Partly derived from Open
Partly derived from Bourdon
Partly derived from Violone

Partly derived from Trombone
   


      [1924?]



[1924]
[1924]



COUPLERS
51. Swell Octave
52. Swell Sub Octave
53. Swell to Great
54. Swell to Choir
55. Choir to Great
56. Choir to Great Octave
57. Choir to Great Sub Octave
58. Swell to Pedal
59. Great to Pedal
60. Choir to Pedal

Pneumatic
Pneumatic
Pneumatic
Pneumatic
Pneumatic
Pneumatic
Pneumatic
Mechanical
Mechanical
Mechanical
 
     
 

ACCESSORIES
5 pistons to Swell
5 pistons to Great
5 pistons to Choir
5 combination pedals to Pedal Organ


(2 prepared for initially)
(2 prepared for initially)
(2 prepared for initially)
(prepared for - 3 later added)
 

Tremulant to Swell
Tremulant to Choir
Lever Swell Pedals to Swell and Choir and Solo Organs
1 reversible pedal for Great to Pedal Coupler
1 stop or rocking tablet to connect pedal compositions to Great Pistons

Tubular-pneumatic action throughout

A suitable electric motor and Kinetic Blower to be supplied for the first portion of the organ.
External casework not included in this estimate.
Front pipes silvered with aluminium.
Pitch C 536 not Diapason Normal.7





The Pedal Trombone 16ft stop, added in 1914
[Photograph by John Maidment (October 2007)]




The Tuba 8ft stop, added to the Choir & Solo Organs in 1924
[Photograph by John Maidment (October 2007)]


 

Details of the additions between 1912 and 1924 were recorded on plaques on the original console, as well as in the records of Norman & Beard and Whitehouse Bros. The Swell Vox Humana 8ft, which left England in September 1912, was donated in memory of Marie Simmons, who was an organist and the wife of The Revd Hugh Simmons. The Pedal Trombone 16ft, which left England in July 1913, was donated by Mrs N. Coungeau in memory of Annie Howard. It was first used at a recital given by George Sampson on 30 March 1914. The Swell Clarion 4ft, which left England in June 1914, was donated in memory of John and Mary Jane Hempsted.7

Some confusion remains concerning the date of the Swell Double Diapason addition. A stop described in the Norman & Beard records as "Swell 16ft Double Diapason" was shipped from England in June 1915, but it was described as the new "Swell Bourdon stop" presented by Mrs N. Congeau when used at a recital in the Cathedral on Monday 11 October 1915.8 A Swell Bourdon 16ft was also recorded on the old console as one of the 1924 additions, which marked the centenary of the City of Brisbane.

The 1924 additions were carried out by Whitehouse Bros of Brisbane, who obtained the necessary pipework and materials from Hill, Norman & Beard in England. The casework in the north transept was added at the same time. The relevant entry in the Whitehouse Ledger at the time includes "supplying 49 Bourdon pipes to Swell Organ, supplying Tuba 61 pipes, Double Diapason 12 pipes CCC to B, . . . supplying 12 pipes CC to B Double Diapason, 48 Dummy pipes to complete design, . . . supplying Pneumatic Action and tubing for borrowing Double Diapason on pedal organ."9






Casework in the north transept,
added in 1924 as a gift of the City of Brisbane
[Photographs by Trevor Bunning (October 2007)]


A letter concerning the Swell Double Diapason from B.B.Whitehouse & Co. to Norman & Beard in 1915 included the statement "We take it that you will use metal as far down as advisable, as the wood pipes are dutiable."10 It appears, therefore, that the upper (metal) registers of the original Swell Double Diapason may have been transferred to the Great as a Double Diapason in 1924, at which time both stops were completed. The Pedal Violone added in 1924 was borrowed from the Great Double Diapason, although this had not been the original intention. Pipes for these two stops are contained in the north-transept casework.

It is significant that George Sampson, the cathedral organist, was directly involved in specifying details of voicing of the organ. His instructions to the builder in 1908 included the following:

I shall be glad if you will bear in mind the following points which I consider very important:-

(A) The whole scheme of the organ to be full cathedral scale and designed for a large and lofty building.
(B) The Diapason work to be especially full and mellow. Stops 2 and 3 on Great are too often of much too equal strength.
(C) All these stops Great Nos 8, 9, 10, Swell 21, 22, Choir 36, are in most English organs of far too rasping and harsh a character. I shall be delighted if you can get the same strength without the usual piercing harshness.
(D) Swell Box. . . . I trust that I shall get an absolute PPP when closed on both Swell and Choir . . .
(E) The Pedal Bourdon to be soft enough quality to accompany the softest stops in the Swell.
(F) The Open Diapason wood cannot be too full or weighty.
(G) The tremulant. Messrs. Whitehouse will write regarding this.
(I) Reeds. The quality of the reeds must not be too smooth. On all except the Oboe I want Trumpet tone not Horn or Cornet tone.
(J) Lever Pedal to Swell and Choir.
(K) Time. The New Cathedral is to be opened in November 1909. If possible we should like the organ. . . 11


 



The north transept before 1962,
showing the organ console at floor level in the organ chamber
and the original configuration of the Great Organ façade pipes
[Photograph by Frank Hurley,1885-1962, from the Hurley negative collection,
National Library of Australia (http://nla.gov.au/nla.pic-an23208845)]




The Norman & Beard console of 1909,
showing vacant plugged holes on the jambs for intended additions
[Photograph by Geoffrey Cox (c.1969)]

Following the enlargement of the building in the 1960s, the organ was extensively rebuilt and enlarged between 1970 and 1972 by Messrs Hill, Norman & Beard (Australia) Pty Ltd, in consultation with Robert Boughen,12 organist of the Cathedral from 1960 to 2004. The old instrument was heard for the last time on 15 February 1970.13

The new console, on which the builder's plate gives the date 1971, arrived from Melbourne well before the organ was completed and opened. It sat for a time alongside the old console on the floor of the Cathedral.14




Old and new consoles on the floor of the Cathedral
with Robert Boughen, organist
[undated newspaper clipping, late 1971 or early 1972]


The organ was officially re-dedicated on Sunday 18 June 1972 in its enlarged and rebuilt form. With the addition of a Positiv Organ in the former location of the organ console, a swallows nest was extended out below the organ chamber and above the ambulatory to accommodate the new console.



The Order of Service for the re-dedication
of the organ in June 1972




The swallows nest for the new console in 1972
with Positiv Organ and re-arranged façade pipes of the Great Organ above
[Photograph by Trevor Bunning (October 2007)]




View of the organ from the sanctuary
[Photograph by Simon Colvin (October 2007)]




The Hill, Norman & Beard console of 1972
[Photograph by Trevor Bunning (October 2007)]

The conceptual framework for rebuilding the organ in 1970-72 was that of providing a versatile instrument capable of playing repertoire from a variety of schools and periods. At that time in Brisbane, there were no modern mechanical-action organs, and the imperatives followed were those evident in major rebuilds elsewhere by Hill, Norman & Beard. Much of the original pipework was revoiced, and wind pressures were generally lowered. The former Great Open Diapason No 1 was redeployed on the Pedal Organ, the former Great Principal 4ft and Fifteenth 2ft were replaced by new stops, and several stops were moved between divisions. The two 8ft string stops on the Solo Organ were reported to have come from the organ of Gloucester Cathedral in England, which was rebuilt around the same time.15 If the report is correct, they had been added to the Gloucester organ in 1920 by Harrison & Harrison,16 but Simon Pierce has noted that the string stops on the Solo Organ in Brisbane are of composite pipework, possibly incorporating some pipes from the original Swell Dulciana.




Intricately carved wooden screen by Colin Blumson,
added in front of the Swell Organ in the mid 1970s
and matching the carving in the choir stalls
[Photograph by John Maidment (October 2007)]


The specification of 1972 was as follows:

GREAT
Double Diapason
Open Diapason
Gemshorn
Stopped Diapason
Octave
Spitz Flute
Twelfth
Fifteenth
Seventeenth
Furniture
Mounted Cornet
Trumpet
Clarion


16
8
8
8
4
4
2-2/3
2
1-3/5
IV
V
8
4


A













SWELL
Quintaton
Open Diapason
Spitz Flute
Viola da Gamba
Voix Célestes
Principal
Stopped Flute
Fifteenth
Full Mixture
Sharp Mixture
Double Trumpet
Cornopean
Clarion
Oboe
Vox Humana


16
8
8
8
8
4
4
2
III
III
16
8
4
8
8


F









G





CHOIR
Contra Salicional
Open Diapason
Bourdon
Dulciana
Prestant
Flute Ouverte
Nazard
Quarte
Tierce
Plein Jeu
Cromorne
Trompette
Tuba


16
8
8
8
4
4
2-2/3
2
1-3/5
III
8
8
8

[enclosed]
B










C
D

SOLO
Flute Harmonique
Quintade
Viole d'Orchestre
Viole Céleste
Concert Flute
Octave Viol
Piccolo
Rohr Schalmei
Spanish Trumpet
Tuba
Octave Tuba


8
8
8
8
4
4
2
8
8
8
4

[enclosed except Tuba & Spanish Trumpet]







H

D
D

POSITIV
Chimney Flute
Principal
Koppel Flute
Octave
Block Flote
Larigot
Octavin
Zimbel
Krummhorn


8
4
4
2
2
1-1/3
1
III
8

(floating)








E

PEDAL
Acoustic Bass
Open Wood
Principal
Violone
Bourdon
Quintaten
Salicional
Octave
Bass Flute
Choral Bass
Spitz Flute
Nachthorn
Mixture
Contra Posaune
Trombone
Trumpet
Tromba
Trompette
Krummhorn
Rohr Schalmei

32
16
16
16
16
16
16
8
8
4
4
2
IV
32
16
16
8
8
8
4




A
I
F
B

I





J
G
J
C
E
H

COUPLERS
Solo to Pedal
Swell to Pedal
Swell Octave to Pedal
Great to Pedal
Choir to Pedal
Solo to Swell
Solo to Great
Swell to Great
Choir to Great
Solo to Choir
Swell to Choir
Positiv to Solo
Positiv to Great
Positiv to Choir
Positiv to Pedal
Swell Octave
Swell Sub Octave
Swell Unison Off
Solo Octave
Solo Sub Octave
Solo Unison Off
Choir Octave
Choir Sub Octave
Choir Unison Off

Swell tremulant
Choir tremulant
Positiv tremulant
Solo tremulant
Piston Coupler Great & Pedal
8 combination pistons to Great Organ
8 combination pistons to Swell Organ
8 combination pistons to Choir Organ
8 combination pistons to Solo Organ
4 combination pistons to Positiv Organ
8 combination pistons to Pedal Organ
6 General combination pistons
Full Organ
General Cancel
Compass: 61/32
Electro-pneumatic action throughout, except for Positiv and Solo (direct electric action).17






Left and right stop jambs on the 1972 console
[Photographs by Trevor Bunning (October 2007)]




Spanish Trumpet 8ft, added to the Solo Organ in 1972
[Photograph by Trevor Bunning (October 2007)]


Following the re-opening of the organ in 1972, recital series by Robert Boughen at the Cathedral included the complete organ works of Bach (twice), Messiaen, Buxtehude, Brahms, Franck, Howells, Liszt, Mozart and Mendelssohn.18 The rebuilt instrument served from this time to inspire several generations of young organists who had not otherwise had the opportunity to perform the wide repertoire of the organ on such a versatile instrument.

Some of the changes effected in 1972 were already being questioned by the early 1990s, when the wind system of the organ was overhauled and the wind pressure of the Tuba was re-set to 16 inches by W.J. Simon Pierce of Brisbane.19 Around 2005-06, W.J. Simon Pierce returned the original Principal 4ft and Fifteenth 2ft to the Great Organ, these having spent a period in exile at St Augustine's Anglican Church, Hamilton.20

With the completion and enlargement of the Cathedral, the instrument was found to lack the necessary projection of sound. Under the direction of Rev. Rupert Jeffcoat (organist of the Cathedral from 2005 to 2010), Simon Pierce sought to restore something of the character of the 1909 instrument, whilst working within the general scope of the 1972 specification. Wind pressures were generally raised, existing pipework was revoiced to suit the higher pressures, and some stops that had been moved between divisions in 1972 were returned to their original location.21 Four of the 1972 stops (Gt. Gemshorn 8ft; Gt. Spitz Flute 4ft; Sw. Spitz Flute 8ft; Ch. Trompette 8ft), were deleted to make way for five new stops (as listed below) that better serve the restored 1909 character of the organ.

The entire work was reported to have been completed late in 2010.22 The revised specification, as noted in July 2011, is as follows:


GREAT
Double Diapason
Open Diapason No. 1
Open Diapason No. 2
Clarabella
Principal
Harmonic Flute
Twelfth
Fifteenth
Seventeenth
Mixture
Mounted Cornet
Double Trumpet
Trumpet
Clarion


16
8
8
8
4
4
2-2/3
2
1-3/5
III
V
16
8
4


A










G




[1915/1924]
[2010, but incorporating 12 façade pipes of 1909]
[1909 Open Diapason No. 3]
[2010]
[1909; returned c.2006]
[1909; returned from Solo]
[1972]
[1909; returned c.2006]
[1972]
[1972; top rank removed 2010]
[1972]
[1972; formerly on Swell]
[1909 (bass) + 2010 (from Tenor G)]
[1972]

SWELL
Bourdon
Open Diapason
Stopped Diapason
Viola da Gamba
Voix Célestes
Principal
Stopped Flute
Fifteenth
Full Mixture
Sharp Mixture
Bassoon
Cornopean
Clarion
Oboe
Vox Humana


16
8
8
8
8
4
4
2
III
III
16
8
4
8
8


F
















[1924; revoiced 1972 as Quintaton]
[1909]
[1909; returned from Great]
[1972]
[1972]
[1909 Gemshorn]
[1972]
[1909]
[1972]
[1972]
[2010]
[1909]
[1914]
[1909]
[1912]

CHOIR [enclosed]
Contra Salicional
Open Diapason
Bourdon
Dulciana
Prestant
Flute Ouverte
Nazard
Quarte
Tierce
Plein Jeu
Clarinet
Trompette
Tuba


16
8
8
8
4
4
2-2/3
2
1-3/5
III
8
8
8


B










C
D


[1972]
[1909]
[1909 Stopped Diapason]
[1909]
[1972]
[1909 Suabe Flute]
[1972]
[1909 Flautina]
[1972]
[1972]
[1909 Clarinet; renamed & revoiced Cromorne 1972]
[1972 Gt Trumpet (from Tenor G) + 1972 Ch Trompette (bass)]
[1924]

SOLO
Flute Harmonique
Quintade
Viole d'Orchestre
Viole Céleste
Concert Flute
Octave Viol
Piccolo
Rohr Schalmei
Spanish Trumpet
Tuba
Octave Tuba


8
8
8
8
4
4
2
8
8
8
4









H

D
D

[enclosed except Tuba & Spanish Trumpet]
[1972 Concert Flute 4]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[2010]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1924]
[1924; extended 1972]

POSITIV [floating]
Chimney Flute
Principal
Koppel Flute
Octave
Block Flote
Larigot
Octavin
Zimbel
Krummhorn


8
4
4
2
2
1-1/3
1
III
8










E


[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]

PEDAL
Acoustic Bass
Open Wood
Principal
Violone
Bourdon
Echo Bourdon
Salicional
Octave
Bass Flute
Choral Bass
Spitz Flute
Nachthorn
Mixture
Contra Posaune
Trombone
Trumpet
Tromba
Trompette
Krummhorn
Rohr Schalmei

32
16
16
16
16
16
16
8
8
4
4
2
IV
32
16
16
8
8
8
4





A
I
F
B

I





J
G
J
C
E
H


[1972]
[1909]
[1972]
[1915/1924]
[1909]
[1924; revoiced 1972 as Quintaten]
[1972]
[1972]
[1909]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1914]
[1972]
[1914/1972]
[1972]
[1972]
[1972]

COUPLERS
Solo to Pedal
Swell to Pedal
Swell Octave to Pedal
Great to Pedal
Choir to Pedal
Solo to Swell
Solo to Great
Swell to Great
Choir to Great
Solo to Choir
Swell to Choir
[Positiv to Solo] [deleted, but to be returned]
Positiv to Great
Positiv to Choir
Positiv to Pedal
Swell Octave
Swell Sub Octave
Swell Unison Off
Solo Octave
Solo Sub Octave
Solo Unison Off
Choir Octave
Choir Sub Octave
Choir Unison Off

Swell tremulant
Choir tremulant
Positiv tremulant
Solo tremulant
Piston Coupler Great & Pedal
8 combination pistons to Great Organ
8 combination pistons to Swell Organ
8 combination pistons to Choir Organ
8 combination pistons to Solo Organ
4 combination pistons to Positiv Organ
8 combination pistons to Pedal Organ
24 General combination pistons
Full Organ
General Cancel
Compass: 61/32
Electro-pneumatic action throughout, except for Positiv and Solo (direct electric action).23


 







The revised specification as seen on the stop-jambs
[Photographs by Geoffrey Cox (July 2011)]





The nave viewed from the triforium passages at the west end
[Photograph by Simon Colvin (October 2007)]




[Photograph by Simon Colvin (January 2009)]

 

 

______________________________________________________________________________

1 J. Donald Bleakley, Guide to St John's Cathedral, Brisbane (Brisbane, 1969).

2 Queensland Heritage Council, Queensland Heritage Register, location 600076; The Heritage of Australia: The Illustrated Register of the National Estate (South Melbourne: Macmillan, 1981), 4/12.

3 The Brisbane Courier (8 January 1909), p. 5.

4 The Brisbane Courier (29 October 1910), pp. 5, 6; The Queenslander (31 October 1910), p. 37.

5 The Brisbane Courier (30 November 1910), p. 2.

6 Specification for Order Number 999 in Norman & Beard Order Book (3 February 1909), supplied by S. Forder (Director and Secretary, Hill Norman & Beard, London) to Geoffrey Cox, 1974. Details of additions [in square brackets] noted at the old console agree substantially with those given in George Sampson, 'The Music at St. John's Cathedral from 1898 to 1935,' Brisbane Cathedral Notes, vol. 19, no. 242 (1 Oct 1935), pp. 133-34, although Sampson states that only 19 stops remained to be added, and does not list the Choir/Solo Orchestral Oboe as 'still required'.

7 Details from plaques on the original console, noted by G. Cox, c.1972; Details of Norman & Beard invoices 11715, 12065 and 12572 to Messrs B.B.Whitehouse & Co., supplied by S. Forder (Director and Secretary, Hill Norman & Beard, London) to Geoffrey Cox, 1974; Brisbane Cathedral Notes, cited by Robert Boughen, c.1974; The Brisbane Courier (1 March 1913), p. 16.

8 Norman & Beard Invoice 12990 to Messrs B.B.Whitehouse & Co. (21 June 1915), supplied by S. Forder (Director and Secretary, Hill Norman & Beard, London) to Geoffrey Cox, 1974; Brisbane Cathedral Notes, cited by Robert Boughen, c.1974.

9 Whitehouse Bros Ledger (1922-1940), p. 79.

10 Letter dated 30 April 1915 from B.B. Whitehouse & Co. to Norman & Beard, supplied by S. Forder (Director and Secretary, Hill Norman & Beard, London) to Geoffrey Cox, 1974.

11 Letter dated 26 December 1908 from George Sampson to Norman & Beard, supplied by S. Forder (Director and Secretary, Hill Norman & Beard, London) to Geoffrey Cox, 1974.

12 Hill, Norman & Beard Order nos Q793, 867 & 877, noted in OHTA News, vol. 14, no. 2 (April 1990), pp. 27, 29.

13 Date supplied by Dr R.K. Boughen (Cathedral Organist 1960-2004) in personal communication to G. Cox, November 2004.

14 Undated newspaper clipping, late 1971 or early 1972, supplied by John Maidment.

15 S.J. Webb, 'The rebuilt Gloucester Organ,' The Musical Times, vol. 112 (1971), p. 799.

16 The Organs and Organists of Gloucester Cathedral (Friends of Gloucester Cathedral, c.1972), pp. 17-19.

17 Specification noted by G. Cox, 1972.

18 Biographical notes provided for a recital at Brisbane City Hall during the 30th Annual Conference of OHTA (30 September 2007).

19 The Organ Voice, vol. 19, no. 3 (December 1991), p. 56.

20 Personal communication to G. Cox from W.J. Simon Pierce, August 2008.

21 Interim reports were provided in OHTA News, vol. 33, no. 1 (January 2009), p. 10, and in Organ Australia, vol. 5, no. 3 (September 2009), pp. 8-9.

22 David Vann, 'An Organ Ramble to St John's Cathedral, Brisbane,' Organ Australia, vol. 7, no. 1 (January 2011), pp. 14-17.

23 Specification noted by Geoffrey Cox, July 2011, with details of changes provided by Simon Pierce.